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Absolute is a pop music writing and production team in Simon Fuller's 19 Entertainment formed in 1988.

BackgroundEdit

Absolute were founded by Paul Wilson and Andy Watkins after they met at university and decided to pursue a career in music. Initially, Absolute was a band project with the release of two singles: "Don't You Wanna be Mine" (1991) and "Introduce Me to Love" (1992) on Rhythm King Records. The latter featured the vocals of John Paul Barrett. Watkins and Wilson, without Barrett, then ventured into the world of dance remixing. After achieving critical acclaim for their work on artists such as Lisa Stansfield, the Nightcrawlers, Mica Paris, James Taylor Quartet and Al Green, the pair were approached by Pete Evans of Big Life Management for management. Evans himself was considering branching out on his own and, with the help of Simon Fuller, formed Native Management with Absolute as his initial signing. Tracey Ackerman joined the songwriting duo in the late 90's as a regular songwriting partner.

Spice GirlsEdit

IntroductionEdit

Simon Fuller offered the pair a publishing deal to concentrate on song writing to them. Through BMG Music, Absolute were introduced to a new girlband called, at that time, Spice by BMG Publishings' Mark Fox. Absolute told Fuller of the girls they had discovered and asked whether he would consider managing them. This he did, and after much songwriting, the now Spice Girls were signed to Virgin Records and the first album Spice was released in November 1996 leading to a BRIT nomination in that year for Best Producers.

SpiceEdit

Main Article: Spice

It was in May 1996, that they were to first meet the Spice Girls. Watkins commented about their first meeting:

"They played us a few tracks, which we didn't particularly like. But they played a track called Feed Your Love, that was dark and cool. So we thought, this is OK. We can work with this".

After that, a songwriting session was booked within the next few days, but the musical association between them didn't seem to go well at the beginning. Wilson remembered:

"When they started to sing it was never quite right: from our point of view. It was very poptastic".

Watkins recalled:

"After two sessions we phoned our managers and said `This just ain't happening´."

It was at this point that Watkins and Wilson heard Wannabe for the first time. When speaking about the song, Wilson said:

"We listen to it and we didn't get it at all. It was so different to what we were doing. We thought is this going to work?".

The next session was the definite one, either they continue to work with the group or break up their relationship. Wilson recalled

"Every previous time we'd met up with the girls we had prepared a backing track. This time we have nothing."

Watkins also said:

"They said they wanted to do something up and a bit of fun, so we just off the top of our heads started to come up with a full-on disco backing track which became Who Do You Think You Are."

Wilson said of the song:

"The thing is when they wrote it, they were also writing the dance routine, constructing the video, all at the same time as writing the song. And that's when the penny dropped".

Watkins also said:

"They said they wanted to do something up and a bit of fun, so we just off the top of our heads started to come up with a full-on disco backing track which became Who Do You Think You Are."

Wilson said of the song:

"The thing is when they wrote it, they were also writing the dance routine, constructing the video, all at the same time as writing the song. And that's when the penny dropped".

Watkins commented:

"Geri would come up with the concept for a song. Typically, she'd sing one line and the girls would pick up on it or we'd pick up on it and construct around it and then Mel C and Emma would be very active. They'd really like to sit and sing melodies and go off and come up with little sections"

Other AlbumsEdit

Main Article: Spiceworld and Schizophonic

Absolute continued to work on the subsequent Spice Girls album, Spiceworld, and then continued their development of singer/songwriter Shernette May. During this time they were contacted by Geri Halliwell who informed them of her decision to leave the Spice Girls and asked them whether they would consider writing and producing her solo project. On returning to the UK, Watkins and Wilson embarked on the project, leading to the release of Schizophonic in May 1999. They continued to contribute to Halliwell's subsequent albums but to a lesser extent.

DiscographyEdit

Spice GirlsEdit

Geri HalliwellEdit

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